Aleksandar Maćašev, a Brooklyn-based visual artist, recorded his average daily mood for two consecutive years, making sure to condense his feelings into the smallest understandable form of communication: a color. Macasev chose a hexidecimal color code to represent his mood at the end of each night and eventually transformed the 730 colors into an installational project. The experiment allows for much personal interpretation by the viewer, especially considering the varied cultural and emotive definitions of color. The largest ChromaTweet project is located in DUMBO, Brooklyn, New York and I sincerely hope to view it this coming week during my adventure to the city. 

Although I still haven’t succeeded in visiting the Whitney Museum of American Art, I have been enjoying the video series regarding the future of the museum, which is to be placed in the gallery district of Chelsea near the southern entrance of The High Line. 

The new building on Gansevoort Street will be bordered by the Hudson River and the southern entrance to the High Line, New York’s beloved new elevated park, which runs through Chelsea’s non-profit arts institutions and the largest gallery district in the world. 
 
The future Whitney is designed to embrace and reciprocate the energy of the neighborhood and provide a stimulating and immersive space in which to experience art. Renzo Piano’s design invites the neighborhood into the museum through a continual play of interior and exterior exhibition spaces.
 
A grand staircase leads to the temporary exhibition space of more than 18,000 square feet—the largest column-free museum gallery in New York City—providing unprecedented opportunities to show innovative work across all media.
Totaling 25,000 square feet, the next two floors will offer the first comprehensive view of the Whitney’s unsurpassed collection of modern and contemporary American art, which has grown from 2,000 works in 1966 to more than 19,000 today. The top floor features a sky-lit gallery for large-scale artists’ projects and an indoor and outdoor café. There are 13,000 square feet of outdoor galleries spread across four levels that will be used for exhibitions with the city as their backdrop.

A study center, conservation-lab, research library, and state-of-the-art classrooms link the Museum’s intellectual resources with the galleries and other public spaces. The Whitney’s new theater allows for multiple configurations and uses, including performance, film and installation. In a proscenium arrangement, it houses 170 seats.
Reaching high and west towards the Hudson, and stepping back gracefully east from the vibrant streets of the city, the museum will be the cultural anchor for this evolving neighborhood and provide flexible and aspirational spaces for contemporary artists to realize their visions.

The new design is wonderfully contemporary and the location couldn’t be more perfect! You can view remaining videos regarding the Whitney’s new location and expansion here

As noticeable from my posts this week, I’ve been recently obsessing over art in which the primary element is color. Markus Linnenbrink, a German installation artist and sculptor, creates his art through a process filled with watered-down pigments, resin, and a sharp eye for color harmony. A majority of his artistic works fill public spaces and galleries entirely: coating each wall (and sometimes floor and ceiling) in a myriad of colorful lines and paint drips. 

To find more about Linnenbrink and his work, visit his website

I’m in the midst of researching Josef Albers and his theories of color, so naturally, I am tempted to post every Homage to the Square photograph I can get my hands on. Instead, I’ll leave you some beautiful words from the artist himself:

When I paint and construct, I try to develop visual articulation. I do not think then about abstraction, and just as little about expression. I do not look for isms, and not at momentary fashions. 
I see that art is essentially purpose and seeing that form demands multiple presentation, manifold performance. In my own work I am content to compete with myself, and to search with simple palette and with simple color for manifold instrumentation. So I dare further variants. 

02.20.12 @ 00:233

I’m in the midst of researching Josef Albers and his theories of color, so naturally, I am tempted to post every Homage to the Square photograph I can get my hands on. Instead, I’ll leave you some beautiful words from the artist himself:

When I paint and construct, I try to develop visual articulation. I do not think then about abstraction, and just as little about expression. I do not look for isms, and not at momentary fashions. 

I see that art is essentially purpose and seeing that form demands multiple presentation, manifold performance. In my own work I am content to compete with myself, and to search with simple palette and with simple color for manifold instrumentation. So I dare further variants. 

20x200, founded by Jen Bekman, has two profound missions: to enable artists to financially sustain themselves and to allow for the public to be collectors of affordable, quality artwork. Each week new art is introduced on the 20x200 site, featuring a limited supply of prints for as low as twenty dollars each. The options for larger sizes and custom framing orders do, however, increase the price of each work, but to own such a piece is well worth its (still reasonable) price tag.

In my opinion, the possibility of owning limited edition prints of contemporary artists excites me — and the affordable price makes me wish I had more self control! Some of my favorites include: Jason Polan, Sharon Montrose, and Ky Anderson.  

Kinfolk is a growing community of artists with a shared interest in small gatherings. We recognize that there is something about a table shared by friends, not just a wedding or once-a-year holiday extravaganza, that anchors our relationships and energizes us. We have come together to create Kinfolk as our collaborative way of advocating the natural approach to entertaining that we love.

Every element of Kinfolk — the features, photography, and general aesthetics — are consistent with the way we feel entertaining should be: simple, uncomplicated, and less contrived. Kinfolk is the marriage of our appreciation for art and design and our love for spending time with family and friends.

-Nathan Williams, Kinfolk editor

While exploring this collaborative magazine, my fingers tend to linger on each of the aesthetically pleasing pages. The magazine is the epitome of what a design-focused publication should be: simple, elegant, and crisp — but also features a whimsical, cultured atmosphere amongst its layout. Kinfolk Vo. 2 contains over one hundred pages of collaborative writings, photographs, and fortunate surprises (such as barcodes directing you to online media). The photographs are indeed mesmerizing, the sentences are beautifully crafted, and the tone of the gathering-oriented publication made me feel the equivalence of nestling near a warm fire with a loved one, just as intended. 

Kinfolk Volume Two is available here or at local William Sonoma locations. 

“Art resides in the quality of doing; process is not magic.”

    Charles Eames

Charles and Ray Eames, the passionate husband-and-wife duo behind the most legendary mid-century modern creations, were responsible for a lifetime of achievements. The documentary, Eames: The Architect and The Painter, focuses on the marketable brand and most importantly, the image, of the Eames sensation. If you have not yet viewed this wonderful documentary, produced by Jason Cohn and Bill Jersey, and have any interest whatsoever in design, art, mid-century philosophy, or simply want to be creatively inspired, I urge you to do so. It was not only their passion for their products and design company that resonated the most with myself, but also Charles and Ray’s unspoken emotional and creative relationship. To find someone who complements you that well is a rarity, and the couple definitely exploited this strength to its full potential as they formed some of the most prominent designs and concepts of the twentieth century. 

Eames: The Architect and The Painter can be viewed in select theaters, instantly here, and purchased here

Movie stills from Eames: The Architect and The Painter

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