ART HISTORY ABRIDGED

Mark Rothko, born Marcus Rothkowitz in Russia of 1903, initially intended to become an engineer or lawyer, but instead moved to New York City and studied at the Art Students League. Following World War II, the art of the period increasingly shifted to depict the tragedies of the human condition, and Rothko felt that most figures could not serve his intended purposes without mutilation or abstraction. As a result, all references to the physical world disappeared within Rothko’s work in the 1940’s and sections of deliberately applied colors became the focus of his paintings. The liquified paint medium soaked the canvas, leaving behind a soft, indistinct edge to each geometric form — a form that Rothko utilized to convey a multitude of emotional states. 

Photographic source. 

arbusfinch:

Picasso
Guitar (metal)
1912

Making a radical transition from the traditional methods of sculpture (which were often crafted from bronze, wood, or marble), Pablo Picasso created an astonishing form of assemblage. His first model of Guitar was constructed in 1912 from cardboard, later changing his medium to sheet metal. The various planes of the sheet metal suggest much volume, creating a structure the public contextualized to be a musical instrument. At its time of reveal, viewers of Guitar were sent in an outrage for that most spectators of art simply did not know how to view the object and could not determine if it had enough merit to be considered “art”. 

02.02.12 @ 00:003

arbusfinch:

Picasso

Guitar (metal)

1912

Making a radical transition from the traditional methods of sculpture (which were often crafted from bronze, wood, or marble), Pablo Picasso created an astonishing form of assemblage. His first model of Guitar was constructed in 1912 from cardboard, later changing his medium to sheet metal. The various planes of the sheet metal suggest much volume, creating a structure the public contextualized to be a musical instrument. At its time of reveal, viewers of Guitar were sent in an outrage for that most spectators of art simply did not know how to view the object and could not determine if it had enough merit to be considered “art”. 

alecshao:

Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Surrounded Islands, 1980-83

Biscayne Bay, Greater Miami, Florida

“Eleven Islands surrounded by 6.5 million square feet of floating pink woven polypropylene fabric covering the surface of the water and extending out 200 feet from each island into the bay. 

The fabric was sewn into 79 patterns to follow the contours of the 11 islands.”

Husband and wife artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude were born on the same day: the 13th of June, 1935. Alongside sharing this coincidence, the two boast a large oeuvre of collaborative installation pieces centralized around the theme of wrapped objects. To wrap an object, according to Christo, is to completely change its identity, revealing the most basic features and proportions of the object while concealing the actual item. Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s works consist of entire environments, temporarily utilizing one portion of the environment to create new perceptions in consciousness. The result is an ephemeral work of art in which lasting impressions follow the removal from the exhibition site.

russianavantgarde:

“Tatlin’s Tower” The Proposed Monument to the Third International by Vladimir Tatlin (1919)

Tatlin ideally wanted this structure to be made of steel and glass, two elements that weren’t available in the Soviet Union during times of economic crisis. The monument was never realized as a piece of architecture, but instead, remained a physical and metaphorical model for an industrial dream the Soviets could not obtain.

paperimages:

Wassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866-1944) - Winter Landscape - 1909

Born in the mid-19th century in Moscow, Wassily Kandinsky proved to be a master of all trades, experimenting with painting, printmaking, design, teaching, and art theory. Stimulated by French paintings in 1895, particularly Monet’s Haystacks series, Kandinsky began to take notice of the communication of color as opposed to subject matter or lighting techniques. As the 1900’s came about, Kandinsky’s work was heavily influenced by Art Nouveau and Russian folk art, including many relations to fairytale scenery. Following exhibitions in Moscow, Dresden, Berlin, Paris, and various large cities, Kandinsky simplified his favorite genre of painting: landscapes. Under the influence of the Fauvist movement, he returned to his previous obsession with color, creating paintings filled with intense hues and increasingly abstracted forms. In 1910, the Compositions body of work began, proving to be one of Kandinsky’s ever-lasting impressions on the history of modern art.

01.09.12 @ 00:00583

paperimages:

Wassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866-1944) - Winter Landscape - 1909

Born in the mid-19th century in Moscow, Wassily Kandinsky proved to be a master of all trades, experimenting with painting, printmaking, design, teaching, and art theory. Stimulated by French paintings in 1895, particularly Monet’s Haystacks series, Kandinsky began to take notice of the communication of color as opposed to subject matter or lighting techniques. As the 1900’s came about, Kandinsky’s work was heavily influenced by Art Nouveau and Russian folk art, including many relations to fairytale scenery. Following exhibitions in Moscow, Dresden, Berlin, Paris, and various large cities, Kandinsky simplified his favorite genre of painting: landscapes. Under the influence of the Fauvist movement, he returned to his previous obsession with color, creating paintings filled with intense hues and increasingly abstracted forms. In 1910, the Compositions body of work began, proving to be one of Kandinsky’s ever-lasting impressions on the history of modern art.

For years, Pablo Picasso hid one of present-day society’s most coveted modern oil paintings within his studio, hesitant to release it’s then-shameful content to the public. Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, released in 1907, contains five female nudes, all of which are women of Avignon Street’s brothel in Barcelona. Each posing in an erotic manner, the women gaze shamelessly into the eyes of the viewer, physically and psychologically confronting the artwork’s spectators. Their bodies are depicted with harsh, angular lines and are topped with masculine, mask-like faces, resembling African masks Picasso had previously been in contact with. Much after the piece was revealed, Picasso described the work as his “first exorcism painting” while keeping quiet that the underlying theme initially surfaced because of his fear of contracting venereal disease. The work, measuring a life-sized eight feet in height, can be viewed in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art. 

Film photographs taken by myself on January 2nd, 2012. 

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